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The Nation's Premier Cannabusiness Law Firm

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CWCBE

Recognized Industry Leaders

The Hoban Law Group is Colorado's original, experienced cannabis business law firm since 2008, providing expert advice to clients in the regulated, retail marijuana dispensary system and the industrial hemp industry. As a burgeoning movement has become a multi-million dollar industry, HLG has grown with it, home to a national footprint of attorneys licensed in over a dozen states across the country with the expertise to offer clients a one-stop-shop for their rapidly expanding business legal needs.

Our attorneys have significant experience working in a highly regulated environment on behalf of clients that include marijuana entrepreneurs, industrial hemp producers, ancillary businesses and even local, state and international governmental bodies seeking regulatory counsel as they legalize marijuana for medical or recreational purposes. With decades of combined experience, our attorneys strive to meet our clients' needs ranging from commercial litigation and FDA/FTC regulatory compliance to general corporate governance, branding and franchising and municipal law and regulatory compliance. They are joined by a team of professional staff with widely varied experience in legislative policy consulting, litigation support and nutraceutical expertise.

With the highest possible degree of professionalism that our clients have come to expect, our national team of attorneys connects serious business clients to each other with the shared goal of legitimizing the fastest-growing industry in the United States. Whatever your cannabusiness needs may be; HLG is ready to help you meet your goals and grow your business. 

HLG News

Canna Business 101: Insurance Coverage Options

Like other agribusinesses, cannabis grow, processors and sellers' insurance needs include life and health, property (farm, dwelling and homeowners), casualty, cargo, equipment breakdown, ­automobile, ­business owner, commercial, general ­liability, ­business interruption and workers' compensation coverage.

However, because of industry-specific risk factors such as theft (cash-only businesses carrying high value ­inventory), security, regulated waste disposal, and neighbor complaints, marijuana-related businesses have additional needs including theft ­coverage for valuable crops, ­professional liability coverages for prescribing doctors, and products liability policies for product growers and processors.

Further, because marijuana is a "data-driven" industry, cyberliability and electronic data policies are critical for patient-personal-information-storing dispensaries in the event of a client database breach or theft.

Apple Valley Town Council approves ban on marijuana with glimmer of hope for activists

Attorney Pamela Epstein, who represents the High Desert Cannabis Association, told the Daily Press she was pleased by the Council’s decision, calling the consideration to allow cannabis delivery “baby steps” in the right direction.

“I am cautiously optimistic about what happened this evening and I think every first step is shaky, just like your first step when you are a child,” Epstein said. “We really made some progress with the Council members. And really, all you need is three.”

 

New York Aims for Reform

New York may be famous for a lot of things. But within the cannabis industry, it’s not considered a poster child for savvy MMJ regulation.

That was the takeaway from New York City attorney Noah Potter, a lawyer who works in conjunction with Colorado-based cannabis law firm Hoban & Feola.

“Every last bit of it is strange,” Potter said. “Everything they’re recommending was foreseeable from the outset. It’s an implicit admission that the program was deficient from the beginning.”

He agrees the changes will probably help make the New York MMJ program more viable in the long term by expanding the patient pool. But Potter the expects the state will drag its feet on implementing the reforms, and that it’ll be months before many of them will be implemented.